Third anniversary: my heart and flesh exult in the living God

I started this blog three years ago in order to provide some meditations on the mysteries of faith as found in the words and deeds of the philosopher Pope, Blessed John Paul II. It is fitting to mark our third anniversary on the Day of the Resurrection of Christ. For Blessed John Paul II circles about this mystery of faith frequently in his writings and homilies. In Dominum et Vivificantem he asserts that the definitive expression of the mystery of God’s gift of communion is had on this day in the Resurrection.” 

John Paul II proclaimed that love is stronger than death; love is stronger than sin.

Guardini leads off his meditation on the Glorious mysteries by stating that the life of Christ, as indeed any man, seems to be a defeat and failure in death. But in Christ there is a victory through love. “These things were not a victory in the human sense, although even humanly speaking, the victor is not the one who silences the testimony truth, but rather the one who maintains it to the end, for in some way it will prevail.” Guardini continues – here we a not concerned with this but with God “who has created the world, who has surrounded it with his love, who has become man, and who has suffered the guilt and doom of the world.”

And with the Resurrection, Guardini said, “something in the world was changed once and for all. A new creation emerged . It stands; no power can extinguish it.” There is a hope, a splendor, beyond  the darkness of death, says Guardini.

The source of this renewal, according to Blessed John Paul II is the communion of the Trinity, expressed in and through the Resurrection.  “The messianic raising up of Christ in the Holy Spirit reaches its zenith in the Resurrection in which he reveals himself as the Son of God, full of power.” And the sources of this power “gush forth in the inscrutable Trinitarian communion.” (Dominum et Vivificantem §24)

John
Paul preached the Lenten retreat to the Papal household of Pope Paul
VI. He pointed out that God “had already made this day (Sunday) his own
in the wonderful work of creation, which ever encompasses existence, good
and glory.” But through our disobedience death entered the world, and
God “again made that day his own through his victory over death.” He is
“not a God of the dead but of the living.”

Pope
Francis provides a simple but powerful meditation on this same passage –
“why look for living among the dead.” Human beings in such despair
always return to death as the final state and darkness as the final end.
But a humble believer has learned otherwise from the Lord, who no doubt learned this passage from his mother, Mary — “My heart and flesh exalt in the
living God” Psalm 84.2

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